Broken Hallelujah ACME

[photo: image of a billboard on wheels. text reads, “sex worker: a person who consensually exchanges their own sexual labor or sexual performance for compensation. Sex work is not the same as forced sex trafficking or sex slavery. learn about the people and facts behind sex work at swaay.org”]
deviantfemme:

I think this is an incredibly important distinction to make. Sex work is an occupational choice, and sex trafficking/slavery are never consensual.  


[photo: image of a billboard on wheels. text reads, “sex worker: a person who consensually exchanges their own sexual labor or sexual performance for compensation. Sex work is not the same as forced sex trafficking or sex slavery. learn about the people and facts behind sex work at swaay.org”]

deviantfemme:

I think this is an incredibly important distinction to make. Sex work is an occupational choice, and sex trafficking/slavery are never consensual.  

a rose by any other name

a rose by any other name

6,000 ++ notes in ONE week?

Overwhelming response to this Sex Worker Rights poster campaign I posted 7 days ago. I have read every single comment on reblogged posts…and am glad to see such a positive view of the concept that sex work isn’t going away, sex workers are like you and like me….and the sex work industry deserves respect, even if we do not all agree with it or like it. It seems most of you agree that at base level- sex work IS real work, and those who choose this profession do so out of their own agency. 

Some of the comments have been insanely debase and offensive, some violent… but it’s been a joy to see my sentiments immediately rallied when other strangers would repost and check the previous blogger on their misinformed ignorant opinions. 

CHEERS on the SOLIDARITY. 

http://brokenhallelujahacme.tumblr.com/post/11328064622/sex-workers-need-human-rights-not-legal-wrongs

SEX WORK is REAL WORK

St James Infirmary 2011 Media Launch

The debate as to whether or not becoming a sex worker is an “empowered choice” hinges on the greatest fallacy affecting the sex industry. Contrary to what this debate implies, sex workers don’t make a choice—we make choices, plural—all the time, every minute of every day, just like everybody else. We make a choice to talk to this customer or to that one, to stay or to go, to work tomorrow or to take the day off, to leave the industry or to remain. Like all individuals, we make lots of decisions: what to wear, how to spend our money, what to do on our days off. Some of these decisions empower us, others don’t. Like all individuals, we do not wish to be defined by any one of our choices. Contrary to how we are so often perceived, sex workers don’t define ourselves entirely by our occupation. We don’t sell ourselves, we sell sex. Abolitionists believe prostitution is a crime against poor people whereas individuals who advocate for the decriminalization of sex work often believe that poverty is the social ill, and that efforts by anyone to take away an individual’s source of income are what’s criminal—not that Lloyd or anyone could ever really stop a person from selling sex. Thinking of women as entirely unable to make decisions and ignoring the reality that such decisions may be necessary for survival denies poor women and other sex workers the dignity of their experience.
I am both flattered & impressed… my photoset I blogged only 3days ago “SEX WORKERS NEED HUMAN RIGHTS, NOT LEGAL WRONGS” has over 1,028 notes already! I appreciate you people paying attention to something worthwhile. Cheers. Spread the knowledge.

Sex Workers Need HUMAN RIGHTS, Not Legal Wrongs

*TURN OFF THE BLUE LIGHT, IRELAND POSTER CAMPAIGN*

industry jokes

industry jokes

audaciaray:

Here’s what I said this afternoon:

Like many people who lay claim to the word feminist, I am a white cisgender woman. I am also a sexual assault survivor, and I am a former sex worker, and so I want to complicate a few things for you.

I stand here with a great degree of ambivalence, because…

leraje:

How To Be an Ally To Sex Workers

1) Don’t Assume. Don’t assume you know why a person is in the sex industry. We’re not all trafficked or victims of abuse. Some people make a choice to enter this industry because they enjoy it, others may be struggling for money and have less of a choice.

2) Be Discreet and Respect Personal Boundaries. If you know a sex worker, it’s OK to engage in conversation in dialogue with them in private, but respect their privacy surrounding their work in public settings.  Don’t ask personal questions such as “does your family know what you do?” If a sex worker is not “out” to their friends, family, or co-workers, it’s not your place to tell everyone what they do.

3) Don’t Judge. Know your own prejudices and realize that not everyone shares the same opinions as you. Whether you think sex work is a dangerous and exploitative profession or not is irrelevant compared to the actual experiences of the person who works in the industry. It’s not your place to pass judgment on how another person earns the money they need to survive.

4) Watch Your Language. Cracking jokes or using derogatory terms such as “hooker”, “whore”, “slut”, or “ho” is not acceptable. While some sex workers have “taken back” these words and use them among themselves, they are usually used to demean sex workers when spoken by outsiders.

5) Address Your Prejudices. If you have a deep bias or underlying fear that all sex workers are bad people and/or full of diseases, then perhaps these are issues within yourself that you need to address.  In fact, the majority of sex workers practice safer sex than their peers and get tested regularly.

6) Don’t Play Rescuer. Not all sex workers are trying to get out of the industry or in need of help. Ask them what they need, but not everyone is looking for “Captain Save-A-Ho” or the “Pretty Woman” ending.

7) If you are a client or patron of sex workers, be respectful of boundaries. You’re buying a service, not a person. Don’t ask for real names, call at all hours of the day/night, or think that your favorite sex worker is going to enter into a relationship with you off the clock.

8 ) Do Your Own Research. Most mainstream media is biased against sex workers and the statistics you read in the news about the sex industry are usually inaccurate. Be critical of what you read or hear and educate yourself on who exactly is transmitting diseases or being trafficked.

9) Respect that Sex Work is Real Work. There’s a set of professional skills involved and it’s not necessarily an industry that everyone can enter into. Don’t tell someone to get a “real job” when they already have one that suits them just fine.

10) Just because someone is a sex worker doesn’t mean they will have sex with you. No matter what area of the sex industry that someone works in, don’t assume that they are promiscuous and willing to have sex with anyone at any time.

11) Be Supportive and Share Resources. If you know of someone who is new to the industry or in an abusive situation with an employer, by all means offer advice and support without being condescending. Some people do enter into the sex industry without educating themselves about what they are getting into and may need help. Despite the situation, calling the police is usually never a good option. Try to find other organizations that are sensitive to the needs of sex workers by contacting the organizations listed below.

12) As you learn the above things, stand up for sex workers when conversations happen.  Share your personal stories if you so choose.  Don’t let the stigma, bigotry and shame around sex work continue.  Remember it’s important that sex workers be allowed to speak for themselves and for allies to not speak for sex workers but to speak with sex workers.

Realize that sex work transcends ‘visible’ notions of race, gender, class, sexuality, education, and identities; sex workers are your sisters, brothers, mothers, fathers, lovers, and friends. Respect them!

Get Active! Contact your local SWOP Chapter to find out what you can do or form your own in the city you live in.

This list composed by the members and allies of Sex Workers Outreach Project-Chicago. Visit us on the web at www.swop-chicago.org

Other Resources-

www.swop-usa.org
www.desireealliance.org
www.boundnotgagged.com

For the past eight years, U.S.-based HIV organizations providing services overseas were forced to formally denounce sex work, and if they didn’t, Uncle Sam closed his checkbook to them. On July 2, the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the Bush-era policy, and many HIV organizations and sex worker advocacy groups praised the decision.

genius idea, prostitution!

genius idea, prostitution!